Stop Eating these 7 Food if You Have High Cholesterol

High Cholesterol

Your body needs some cholesterol to make cells — but it’s the redundant cholesterol that can be a problem, the American Heart Association explains. Your liver produces the natural cholesterol you need, while any redundant high cholesterol in your body generally comes from animal-based foods.

The best diet that can help with cholesterol is the DASH diet, (short for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension). The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet is a dietary pattern designed to prevent and lower high blood pressure (hypertension). It is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein sources, and low-fat dairy products, and low in saturated and trans fats, cholesterol, sweets, sugary beverages, and high-sodium processed foods.

The DASH diet emphasizes:

  • Eating a variety of fruits and vegetables, including leafy greens, berries, citrus fruits, and cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and cauliflower
  • Choosing whole grains, such as brown rice, quinoa, and whole wheat bread instead of refined grains
  • Consuming lean protein sources, such as fish, poultry, legumes, and nuts
  • Choosing low-fat dairy products, such as skim milk, low-fat yogurt, and low-fat cheese
  • Limiting saturated and trans fats, such as those found in fatty meats, butter, and fried foods
  • Avoiding high-sodium foods, such as processed and packaged foods, and using herbs and spices to flavor food instead of salt
  • Limiting sweets and sugary beverages, such as soda and juice.

Research has shown that following the DASH diet can significantly lower blood pressure, and it has also been associated with other health benefits, such as improved cholesterol levels, better insulin sensitivity, and reduced risk of heart disease, stroke, and certain types of cancer.Regenerate response

Below is the primary list the top seven foods you should stop or limit when you’re trying to get your cholesterol under control:

High Cholesterol
Fried foods

Fried foods can be bad for your health when consumed in excess, particularly if they are made using unhealthy oils, such as partially hydrogenated oils or oils high in trans fats.

Frying foods can cause them to absorb a significant amount of oil, which increases their calorie and fat content. This can contribute to weight gain and obesity, which are risk factors for a range of chronic diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, and certain types of cancer.

In addition, when oils are heated to high temperatures during frying, they can produce harmful compounds, such as acrylamide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are associated with inflammation, oxidative stress, and an increased risk of chronic diseases.

High Cholesterol
Butter

Butter is a source of saturated fat, which is considered to be unhealthy when consumed in excess. Saturated fat can raise levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol in the blood, which is a risk factor for heart disease and stroke.

However, butter can also provide important nutrients, such as vitamins A and D, and essential fatty acids. In small amounts, it can be a part of a healthy and balanced diet.

It’s important to note that not all saturated fats are equally bad for health. Some studies suggest that the saturated fat found in dairy products, such as butter, may not be as harmful to health as other sources of saturated fat, such as red meat or processed foods.

High Cholesterol
Cheese

Like butter, cheese is a source of saturated fat, which is considered to be unhealthy when consumed in excess. Saturated fat can raise levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol in the blood, which is a risk factor for heart disease and stroke.

The amount of saturated fat in cheese can vary depending on the type of cheese, with some varieties containing higher amounts than others. For example, hard cheeses, such as cheddar or parmesan, tend to be higher in saturated fat than soft cheeses, such as brie or goat cheese.

That being said, it’s still recommended to consume saturated fats in moderation and to choose lower-fat varieties of cheese when possible. Additionally, people who are lactose intolerant or have a milk allergy should avoid or limit cheese consumption, or opt for lactose-free or plant-based alternatives.

High Cholesterol
Baked Goods

Baked goods, such as cakes, pastries, and cookies, can be high in added sugars, refined flour, and unhealthy fats, such as trans fats, which can contribute to weight gain and a range of chronic diseases, such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer.

Refined flour, which is commonly used in baked goods, has a high glycemic index, which means it can cause blood sugar levels to spike and then crash, leading to feelings of hunger and cravings for more high-carbohydrate foods.

Many baked goods are also high in calories, which can contribute to weight gain and obesity when consumed in excess.

In general, it’s best to consume baked goods in moderation as part of an overall healthy and balanced diet. Opting for whole grain options and reducing added sugars can also help make baked goods a healthier option.

High Cholesterol
Cooking Oils

Cooking oils can have both positive and negative effects on health, depending on the type of oil and how it is used.

Other oils, such as coconut oil or palm oil, are high in saturated fats, which can increase LDL cholesterol levels and increase the risk of heart disease when consumed in excess.

Additionally, when oils are heated to high temperatures during cooking, they can produce harmful compounds, such as acrylamide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are associated with inflammation, oxidative stress, and an increased risk of chronic diseases.

High Cholesterol
Beef

Beef is a rich source of protein, iron, zinc, and other important nutrients. However, it can also be high in saturated fat, which can contribute to an increased risk of heart disease and stroke when consumed in excess.

The amount of saturated fat in beef can vary depending on the cut of meat, with fattier cuts, such as ribeye or brisket, containing higher amounts than leaner cuts, such as sirloin or tenderloin.

Additionally, some studies suggest that consuming red meat, including beef, in excess may be associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer, such as colorectal cancer.

That being said, beef can still be a part of a healthy and balanced diet in moderation. When choosing beef, it’s best to opt for leaner cuts and to limit consumption of processed meats, such as bacon or hot dogs, which are high in sodium and preservatives.

High Cholesterol
Processed meats and sausage

Processed meats and sausages are often high in salt, saturated fat, and preservatives, such as nitrates and nitrites, which can be harmful to health when consumed in excess.

Studies have linked regular consumption of processed meats, such as bacon, sausage, and hot dogs, to an increased risk of certain types of cancer, including colorectal cancer, as well as heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes.

The high levels of sodium in processed meats can also contribute to high blood pressure, which is a risk factor for heart disease and stroke.

Therefore, it’s recommended to limit consumption of processed meats and sausages and to choose leaner, unprocessed sources of protein, such as fish, poultry, legumes, and nuts, whenever possible.

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